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Birmingham Family Law Blog

Co-Parenting Tips For Summer Vacation

For kids, summer vacation is the most exciting time of the year. While no school may mean more fun for them, what about you?

For parents, summer vacation can mean a major change in schedule. Figuring out where the kids will be during the day can be difficult when you have to work. If you are divorced, summer vacation can mean additional adjustments to your custody plan, especially if you want to take a family vacation.

Alabama bill aims to give parents equal footing in custody cases

The long held standard in child custody orders - as many divorced parents know - is to ensure the best interests of the child are met. Typically, this leads to a custody order that allows the child to spend some time with each parent. The time each parent spends with their child, however, does not have to be equal - and often it is not.

For many parents, a standard custody plan means seeing their children every other weekend and maybe once or twice in between. Some Alabama legislators are hoping to change that.

When and how to modify child custody orders

Child custody orders are established based on the needs of the child and circumstances of the parents at that time. As parents know all too well, though, circumstances can change. Child custody orders cannot be modified unless there has been a material change in circumstances. When a life change impacts your ability to uphold your child custody order, or you are concerned for the well-being of your child, it may be time to seek a modification.

Does cheating impact child custody?

Realizing that you have been betrayed by your spouse is devastating. Understandably, many people are unable to move past an extramarital affair and choose to seek divorce.

As you start to work through your divorce, however, you may be wondering whether the reason for your split - the extramarital affair - will have any impact on your child custody.

Understanding 'best interests of the child' in child custody

In all child custody matters, Alabama courts consider the "best interests of the child" above all else. While this phrase is used frequently, it may not be clear to you what, exactly, it means.

Although most parents want what is best for their child, they do not always agree on what that is. In today's post, we will explain what factors the courts consider when determining whether a child custody agreement supports the best interests of the child or children involved.

Parental alienation: What is it, and how can you get help?

It is not an uncommon scenario during and after divorce: One parent is fuming with anger at the other. Mom begins to say bad things about Dad when the children are with her. Eventually, she even begins to limit the time Dad has with them. Soon, his children stop wanting to see their father because their mother has clouded their perception of who he is.

It is a sad fact that parental alienation is a common tactic in divorce. Typically borne out of disdain for the other spouse, the behavior can end up hurting more than just that person - the father in this scenario. It can end up hurting the children involved as well.

Tiebreakers in child custody agreements: When should you use them?

A decision-making committee of two can be a recipe for impasse and endless argument. If the two members don't agree, next steps become difficult to determine.

In a business setting, this sometimes causes partners to dissolve their partnership. In a marriage, an inability of the two parties to agree may lead to divorce.

But what about divorced parents who are raising children together? In this post, we will use a Q & A format to discuss when "tiebreakers" in divorce agreements may be used to decide which ex-parent gets to make the final decision about a particular aspect of child-raising.

New Alabama law supports grandparents' rights to visit grandchildren

It has been a difficult journey for some grandparents in Alabama who wish to keep a relationship with their grandchildren. The recent passing of a bill in Alabama Legislature has given new hope to grandparents who are restricted from seeing family.

This bill comes as a rebuttal after the Alabama Grandparents Visitation Act was struck down in 2010 by courts, stated as unconstitutional. The new law tries to make the rights of parents and children more equal by considering that restricting a relationship between grandparents and grandchildren can have a negative impact on kids.

Talking care: not only of your kids, but of yourself

The familiar preflight ritual contains a word of wise counsel: put on your own air mask first, the announcement says, before trying to help another person.

Figuratively speaking, it's a statement that could also be applied to child care. In order to take care of others well, you've first got to take care of yourself.

In this post, let's apply that reasoning to a consideration of things you can do for your own wellness and renewal, so that you can be fully present for the joys and demands of raising your precious kids amid the challenges of a breakup with the other parent.

Contact

Jason J. Bonar, Attorney at Law, P.C.
1 Independence Plaza
Suite 814
Homewood, Alabama 35209

Phone: 205-208-8118
Fax: 205-536-6945
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